Chiara Micheli

Ascolto rock. Guardo film. Traccio segni. Inseguo visioni. Tengo Londra nel mio garage. Qualche volta dormo. E scrivo. Mi piace la verità, per questo invento storie.

Tag: cinema

DOODLEBUG – the first short film by Christopher Nolan

 

 

We know British filmmaker Christopher Nolan best today for directing the latest trilogy of Batman films, Batman BeginsThe Dark Knight, and The Dark Knight Rises. His recent high-profile non-superhero hit Inception made an impressive, if brief, splash as a mainstream brainbender, which, for me, faintly echoed the thrill he sent through the world of crossover independent film with 2000’s backward-told Memento. Yet, if this doesn’t make me too much of an I-liked-the-early-stuff-cliché, I still think of him most fondly for directing his 1998 feature debut Following, a 16-millimeter, black-and-white, $6000-budget tale of theft, impersonation, and identity shot on the streets of London. (One of the characters breaks into an apartment with a now-striking Batman logo on its door.) But even a project as small-scale as Following has a predecessor, Doodlebug, which you can watch above.

 

“The depths of insanity are explored by a man chasing something in his apartment with a shoe,” promises the video description of the three-minute Doodlebug. In the center of this shadowy, paranoid tale we have Jeremy Theobald, who would go on to star in Following (and appear as a Gotham Water Board Technician in Batman Begins). Nolan shot it back in his days studying English literature at University College London, a school whose film society he led and which he chose expressly for the availability of its cameras and editing gear. His early, handmade pictures have become even more fascinating to watch in light of his declarations in DGA Quarterly interview that he far prefers shooting in film to shooting digitally, and that 3D technology hasn’t much impressed him. But he hardly disdains spectacle, and the article contains a good deal of talk about how he uses CGI and crafts action sequences. Over the years, Nolan’s core enthusiasms seemingly haven’t changed; even Doodlebug, especially by student-film standards, has some pretty cool special effects.

(www.openculture.com)

 

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Akira Kurosawa’s great advice to aspiring filmmakers and writers

So simple, so true.

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Nicholas Ray: The Last Interview by Kathryn Bigelow

Letto: 5491 volte
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In May 1979, during a break from filming Lightning Over Water in collaboration with Wim Wenders, Nicholas Ray granted an interview to Kathryn Bigelow and Sarah Fatima Parsons.  It was to be Nick’s last interview before dying of heart failure about a month later.

A conversation with Nicholas Ray shortly before his death, which associates small memory pieces about his life and films.

Nicholas Ray:  You know, I hate watching Johnny Guitar on television.  But I really appreciate what Andrew Sarris wrote in the «VillageVoice»:  “With ‘Johnny Guitar’ Nick Ray reaches the absolute criteria of the auteur theory.”

Question: What did you think when you went to Europe and noticed how filmmakers, especially, the French ones, were influenced by your work? Truffaut, for example?

NR: And also Godard, Rohmer.  Yes, I did have a strong influence on their work.  I’m not sure if it was always for the best.  I remember one evening I was driving home during the filming of “Rebel Without A Cause.”  We shot a scene between Jim and Plato.  I was whistling.  I was really thrilled thinking, “My God, the French will adore that scene.”

Q: Your films have also influenced the new German and American cinema.

NR: I hear that Wim Wenders is going to start a new film soon, “Hammett.”   He’s a great guy.  I think he’s had a hard time with the screenplay.

Q: He originally wanted to write it with the author of the book, Joe Gores.

NR: He tried but it didn’t work out.  It seldom does with the author of a book.  A lot of filmmakers have failed.  I myself thought I could do it, but it was a failure.  Authors fall in love with their own words, and you have to be pitiless as a director or screenwriter.

Q: So that it won’t become literature?

NR: Yes, that’s right.  I mean it’s another kind of literature.  They tend to get excited about one sentence, visualize it, and then it becomes really monotonous.  You should never talk about something you can show, and never show something you can talk about.

Q: Doesn’t it have something to do with what actors bring to a film? Continua a leggere/Continue reading

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